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Dec 14, 2021
In Chillin' In The Lounge
I have just used my CDC vouchers :) content media
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Jun 02, 2021
In Current Affairs
I meant my mum. :)
I got my shot!  content media
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Emboldened
Feb 12, 2021
In Chillin' In The Lounge
Wishing everyone a happy 牛 year! :) content media
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Dec 31, 2020
Wishing fellow forumers a happy 2021! :) content media
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Dec 01, 2020
OMG over a third of the stalls at Jewel food court have closed down :( content media
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Nov 01, 2020
In Chillin' In The Lounge
You probably already know this, but property is expensive in Singapore. Homes can cost anywhere from hundreds of thousands for HDB flats to millions of dollars for private condos and landed homes. So for many of us, buying a home is our biggest single expense and our home loan (or mortgage) repayments the biggest liability in our lives. Let’s not talk about the Crazy Rich Asians. Say you’re an Average Joe: Even if you buy a modest under-500k HDB flat - assuming you take 75% to 90% in home loans to finance it - you’re looking at mortgage repayments of at least $1,200 each month (depending on the interest rate and tenure). Considering the median salary of Singaporeans is $4,563 (Ministry of Manpower, 2019), that’s about a quarter of our monthly income! Most of us take decades to pay off this debt, but not Clara Lim, 34, and her husband, Jon Phay, 37. Yes, it’s not uncommon to hear of couples who pay off their homes by their mid-thirties, but what’s interesting is that unlike couples who marry early in their twenties and live frugally for the next 10 years, Clara and Jon actually only tied the knot and bought their Bishan HDB flat two years ago. So how did the couple manage this feat at such a young age? After all, Clara and Jon both hold pretty average-earning jobs as a writer and engineer respectively. Well, first of all, Clara and Jon most definitely didn’t save hundreds of thousands in two years. The saving up took place before they bought the property. In fact, with their savings combined, they actually had just about enough to pay for their $468,000 resale flat in full at the point of purchase. They only took up a home loan because Jon wanted to utilise his CPF funds while he continued working. Clara’s savings: $120,000 Jon’s savings: $80,000 Combined CPF OA: $191,000 CPF housing grants: $70,000 Given this, you’d expect that the couple must have spent their entire twenties staying home and eating cup noodles, but that was not the case. “Frankly, I don’t think Jon put that much effort into saving up that $80,000. He just doesn’t have expensive hobbies,” says Clara. For her, however, it was a different story: “For most of my twenties, I spent all my money on going out with friends, drinking, shopping, etc. But when I was 29 years old, a bad breakup caused me to go on a big lifestyle detox.” Saving $120k after a bad breakup Clara changed her job, changed her mobile number, and as far as her friends were concerned, fell off the face of the earth. For a year or so, she went home straight after work every day. She turned to solitary (and free) hobbies like exercising at the company gym, reading library books, hiking and cycling. Even after she had healed and was able to socialise and date again, those frugal habits still persisted. “Without really planning to, I had saved a ton of money. I earned about $60,000 a year, and saved about 80% to 90% of my take-home pay. After about three years, I had saved up about $120,000 in cash,” she shares. Debt-free in 24 months  As mentioned earlier, Clara and Jon took a small home loan to keep aside some cash savings and utilise the CPF they were earning.  “Although we could have paid off the entire flat in cash and CPF, Jon suggested we take a housing loan because he wanted to utilise his CPF contributions while he continues working. I, on the other hand, did not want too much financial commitment,” says Clara.  In the end, they compromised on a $53,000 loan for two years, which seemed like an acceptable commitment period to Clara. The amount is too small for a bank loan, so they went for an HDB loan. Here’s the breakdown: Flat price: $468,000 Down payment: $261,000 in CPF (including grant) + $149,000 in cash Deposit: $5,000 in cash HDB home loan: $53,000 at 2.6% p.a. for two years Monthly repayments: $2,276 using CPF  More at https://www.propertyguru.com.sg/property-guides/pgf-feature-couple-pay-off-470k-flat-in-two-years-34993
Young, Thrifty and Debt-Free: This Couple Paid Off Their 470k Bishan Flat In 2 Years content media
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Emboldened
Jun 02, 2020
In Chillin' In The Lounge
Honesty is the best policy! :) https://www.facebook.com/AngelSupermart/posts/3015946545151171
Man was charged $1397 instead of $13.97 at Angel Supermart, thankfully shop owner reached out to him to rectify the mistake. content media
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Emboldened
Apr 27, 2020
Facebook spies on your web activity that happen outside its own domain. content media
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Emboldened
Mar 27, 2020
In Current Affairs
https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/boycott-berries
Petition to boycott Berries Singapore 百力果学习丰收园 content media
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Emboldened
Jan 28, 2020
In Current Affairs
Unity@NEX : stocks still available last night (27/1) Guardian@NEX: SOLD OUT
Updates on sale of N95 and surgical masks in local pharmacies and stores content media
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Emboldened
Jul 10, 2019
In Current Affairs
“It’s the absence of hope that makes cancer patients lose all sense of life.” At 32, Andrew has only about four to six months to live, should his current treatments fail. He has Aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and it isn’t the first time medical treatments have failed on him. He had already gone through 10 rounds of what is supposed to be the most effective, available chemotherapy for his case, only for the cancer cells to return with a vengeance. Within the span of less than a year, he has gone from optimistic and hopeful to terminally ill.   When I first met Andrew about 9 years ago, he was an assistant producer at the place I interned at. In short, just an ordinary, healthy person who is few years my senior. Yet, when I met him at a cafe near his home earlier last week, he had to walk with the help of a cane. What used to be the physique of a sportsman is now this frail person with a slight hunchback, pallid face, and a bare head, save for a soft fuzz of hair that has started to regrow. He was first diagnosed with stage 1 Aggressive Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a type of cancer that affects certain types of immune system cells, last June. The tumour has since grown to a point where he is unable to ‘survive’ without the use of morphine. The tumour growth near his lungs presses on his rib cage every time he takes a breath, causing him immense pain. Pain patches’ like the one pictured above also helps to relieve the pain. Image Credit: Andrew Hui Back then, it was only by pure coincidence that the doctor stumbled upon the tumor.   Stage 1 Only, No Biggie It was only when Andrew checked himself into A&E for a high fever one night when they found out. He had gone to the hospital as a precautionary measure, as he had a history with Pneumothorax (collapsed lung). Fearing complications that could have arose from the major surgery he did for Pneumothorax prior, the doctors ran some x-ray tests on him. The tests returned with signs of a tumour growth at the upper part of his chest. Further biopsy tests identified it as stage 1 Lymphoma. “Back then, the doctors were super confident—it wasn’t a complicated case. 90 percent of people who had this [cancer] at this stage have been cured.” With that assurance and his strong belief in the medical system, he proceeded with the recommended treatments—chemotherapy—confident that it was nothing to worry about. “I had great trust in our medical treatments. Like eh, stage one [only], what is this man! You know, I thought this will just be something like a few months ‘holiday’ where I go for treatments, then I’ll be out soon enough.” Nobody would have expected that he was that 10 percent. Instead of shrinking, the tumour grew from 8cm to 13.5cm. By this time, the cancer cells had began to spread to his other organs—the worst sign of any cancer. The 10 rounds of chemotherapy, which comprised of R-EPOCH therapy, and another stronger, RICE therapy, had failed. As he went on to explain how chemotherapy works on cancer patients, Andrew added that it is something he would never wish upon anybody. “It lives up to its reputation as a very uncomfortable process.” The side effects of chemotherapy varies for each person. For Andrew, the sessions completely sucked the life out of him and made it impossible to palate anything.  “I would eat and then ‘Merlion’ everything out.” Besides the nausea, lethargy, and hair loss, there was also a general uneasiness in his body which he could only describe as “an oily feeling,” and “it’s like your body is rejecting [what’s being done to it]” Coming To Terms With The Truth When he saw the PET scan and heard the doctor’s remarks, his first thoughts were: “So how long more do I have left?” “I don’t want to be in a situation where I haven’t said my goodbyes and I haven’t done my final things before I pass away.” Any cancer patient would have mentally prepared themselves for the worst, but knowing that the worst that they could expect came true is another thing altogether. The news gutted Andrew and his family. A Christian, he had on many occasions questioned why God allowed this to happen to him. He questioned why it had to be him. Why it had to be cancer. Acceptance only came later, and it came from the pain that he had to go through. “There was one night I really thought I was really going to die.” He recounted to me about the night a bad coughing fit left him curled up into a ball on his bed. Besides the physical pain he felt at his ribs and the stars he was seeing from it, it also broke his heart to see his mother crying by his bedside. “My mum said that she wished she could take the pain from me. She said that she wished she could be the one who had cancer instead of me. For me, for a child to see your mother crying for you so helplessly, it was so painful.” In our generation, a lot of us spend long hours at work or with our friends. It was no different for Andrew. Looking back at the times he had placed work and friends above time with his family, his biggest regret is not having spent enough time with his mother. “Ultimately, during the most difficult time of my life it was my mum who sat at the side of my bed. She cannot do anything but sit there and cry, but it’s this kind of relationship that [reminds me that this is something] we should never compromise.” When You’re In The Face Of Death Andrew’s everyday life now revolves around rest. His therapies leave him with little energy for anything else. Besides the 16 or 17 hours of sleep he needs a day, he spends his time on simple pleasures like reading, catching up with friends, or fulfilling his wanderlust through travel shows on Netflix. Since the traditional treatment of chemotherapy has failed, he has gone on to alternative therapies, which works slower and have a lower success rate. And because his is an aggressive cancer, it is now a race against time—for the alternative therapy to save him before the cancer takes his life. However, the prognosis, or ‘time till death’ is not something that the doctors can determine as he is on a relatively new treatment. If it does not work, he will only have up to six months to live. “The truth for cancer patients is that we cling on to every bit of hope if possible because otherwise, there’s really nothing else to cling on to anymore.”   Hope. It is the one thing that keeps Andrew alive despite being in the face of death. Besides, cancer is unlike the common cough and flu, where you know recovery is only a matter of time with the help of medications. Reflecting on his journey, he tells me about how the worst part is when the doctor looks at him with a look of defeat—when they look like they have no idea what else to do. “It’s the absence of hope that makes cancer patients lose all sense of life. The fear of death is what makes people struggle with coming to terms with being terminally ill, he explained, and stressed the importance of seeing death as a happy closure. The change in mindset and the understanding that death is one end to the pain and suffering is what helped him accept death. Last Words: Prioritise Happiness & Hold On To Hope As someone who used to be extremely health conscious, Andrew joked about how he regrets not living life previously. “I used to actively clamp down on a lot of things believing that I have my health under my control. I should have just eaten whatever I want!” Lymphoma, however, is one of those mysterious diseases that do not discriminate. He just happened to one who has it. “I think we should live our life as happy as possible. Make a commitment to live as happy as possible. Happiness is now. Happiness is eating dinner with friends and family instead of doing paperwork at 9pm thinking that your boss and company will appreciate.” For those who are also terminally ill, “Never stop fighting. Fighting on is a big part of fighting cancer.” Many patients get very depressed and scared as they fear the ultimate result of cancer: death. However, one needs to believe that there is light at the end of the tunnel and believe that the pain will end. “You need to believe that it will not be darkness when you close your eyes for the last time. [For me,] that is the hope I need to cling on to because otherwise I will fall into depression.” Even loved ones will not be able to help in this journey, for it is a very personal battle when it comes to accepting death. “We need to cling on to something larger and stronger than ourselves,” Andrew emphasised. “The moment we give up hope, the battle is lost.” https://millennialsofsg.com/2019/05/22/stage-4-cancer-greatest-lesson-life-learn-die/
[SO SAD] Having Stage 4 Cancer At 32 – “The Greatest Lesson In Life Is To Learn How To Die” content media
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Emboldened
Jun 27, 2019
In Chillin' In The Lounge
Song Joong Ki has officially filed for divorce from Song Hye Kyo. On June 27, Song Joong Ki’s attorney Park Jae Hyun officially announced, “Our law firm filed for divorce on behalf of Song Joong Ki at the Seoul Family Court on June 26. Additionally, we would like to convey Song Joong Ki’s official statement.” In his statement, Song Joong Ki apologized to his fans and explained that he hoped for an amicable divorce. The actor’s full statement is as follows: Hello. This is Song Joong Ki. First, I’d like to apologize for delivering this unfortunate news to the many fans who love and care for me. I have begun the process of filing for divorce from Song Hye Kyo. Rather than denouncing one another and arguing over who is to blame, I hope that the divorce process can be wrapped up amicably. I ask for your understanding in regards to the fact that it is difficult to discuss the details of my personal life, and I will recover from my current wounds and do my utmost as an actor to repay you through great productions in the future. Thank you. Song Joong Ki and Song Hye Kyo married in October 2017 after starring together in the hit drama “Descendants of the Sun.” https://www.soompi.com/article/1334872wpp/breaking-song-joong-ki-files-for-divorce-from-song-hye-kyo
OH NO!!!! Song Joong Ki Files For Divorce From Song Hye Kyo!!!!! content media
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Apr 03, 2019
Challenger wants to delist from SGX at 56 cents per share content media
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Emboldened
Feb 12, 2019
In Jobs Classifieds (Hiring)
Funny But True: The Linkedin Effect content media
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Jan 26, 2019
#RIPAloy: Illustrator “marries” Aloysius Pang and Jayley Woo in two beautiful paintings content media
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Sep 16, 2018
Massive Toys “R” Us sale from now to 30 Nov, up to 75% off!!!!!! content media
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Aug 28, 2018
Will ppl stop dissing Yislum after learning about these facts? content media
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