Forum Posts

Ashley Wu
Aug 03, 2022
In Current Affairs
"The national reserves must not be disclosed. If this is made public, the SGD can be subject to attacks by currency speculators" is the mantra of the Singapore government. Enough of this nonsense. Speculative attacks happen during a currency crisis. A currency crisis is a consequence of chronic balance of payments deficits (it's also called a balance of payments crisis). This is how it goes. Due to trade imbalances ie a chronic deficit, the domestic currency of the country is weakened. Its central bank either refuses or is unable to allow the exchange rate to fall. To maintain the rate, the central bank has to keep buying its domestic currency. It continues the buying policy till it runs out of foreign reserves. This leads to a financial crisis as the value of foreign debt rises in relation to the weakened domestic currency. Foreign currency liquidity freezes because no one's going to sell the foreign currency to you if the exchange rate is forcibly maintained at unrealistic levels. Eventually the central bank capitulates because no one can go against the market in the long run. It is forced to devalue the domestic currency to bring it back to equilibrium. This type of scenario happens when the market anticipates that domestic policies will not be adjusted sufficiently to devalue the domestic currency. So they attack the currency by selling (shorting it) at the unrealistic high rate controlled by the central bank. Sooner or later when the government is forced to devalue, speculators buy back the currency at lower rates and make a killing. First BIG LIE: Currency crisis happens when the exchange rate does not respond to market conditions. There is sufficient empirical evidence that such scenarios happen in cases of a pegged currency, ie the rate is fixed to some other currencies. In the case of Singapore, MAS manages on the basis of a floating rate, using an official band to control daily volatility only. Should chronic trade deficits force the rate down, MAS will loosen the band to allow the SGD to devalue. So the above illustrated currency crisis scenario won't happen in Singapore. Second BIG LIE: If the SGD is weakened and the MAS wants to cushion the devaluation, it is forced to intervene in the market to buy up as much of the domestic currency as possible. To do this, MAS makes use of its foreign reserves. Thus, the more forex reserves it holds, the stronger the MAS is to support the SGD. So here's the rub. Like all central banks in the world, the holdings of forex reserves of the MAS are all in the open for the world to see. It is currently about SGD427 billion. There is nothing secretive about it, and it has nothing to do with national reserves. Currency speculators aren't watching your reserves. There are watching the market. If the market sees the currency as over-valued, they know sooner or later the central bank has to devalue. Just like a poker player, if he sees he has a winning hand, he continues raising the stakes. The Third BIG LIE is the increase in asset portfolio of the sovereign wealth funds. The numbers are impressive, but they don't explain how the growth happened. In 2022 Temasek portfolio value grew by S$22b to S$403b, GIC grew by S$280b. Asset growth can come in a number of ways: Internal growth (earnings ploughed back into the business): This is well and good and a pat on the shoulders. Currency translation : Not good. It suggests lack of hedging strategies which could have gone one way or the other way. I mentioned in a previous blog post that the MAS, as a central bank, has to take on market risks which was why they got hit with a S$8.7b revaluation loss in 2022. Unlike MAS, GIC and Temasek can make hedging strategies to minimise translation risks. Valuation : Good picks or bad picks, investing expertise or pure luck, we can't criticise from hindsight. CIO has to make a call. But generally, the last 2 decades have been good to investors who ride along with the massive liquidity pumped out by central banks all over which pushed markets to record heights. But what we should be concerned is the vast amount of holdings in unquoted equities, in both Temasek and GIC. The valuation is anybody's guess. Capital injection : Any idiot could have increased portfolio value with fresh funds. This is not an insult but an aphorism. Leverage (funded by more loans): This is not bad per se, but it means increased risks. Debts for operational purposes are fine. Temasek has often spoken of taking advantage of cheap funds to leverage and it is creeping into the realm of private equity fund management business. Are they investing savings, or running a private equity business? We would prefer hard-nosed risk-averse managers, not Wall Street cowboys. Note that GIC and Temasek make annual contributions to the government of NIR (net income return) based on 50% of a computed 20-year annualised rate on their 'Net Relevant Assets', in basic terms, assets less debts. This means that in a given year, the NIRC (net income return contribution) has no relation to the actual profit or loss. In 2022, the NIRC was S$21.6b but it's not known how much came from GIC and how much from Temasek. We know MAS was unable to contribute due to its S$7.1b losses. Read : An increase in the government's assets is not an increase in national reserves which is assets net of national debt, and Singapore has one of the highest national debt in the world. Where did Temasek's S$22b asset growth come from? : - Was it from its operations? Temasek's net profits in 2022 was S$10.6b. After deducting it's share of the NIRC (how much ???), it did not generate much to increase the asset portfolio. - Did it come from currency translation? It's porfolio geographical distribution showed Singapore 27%, US 21%, but the currency distribution showed SGD 49%, USD 34%, HKD 7%. This shows there were currency hedges. USD appreciated 1% and HKD gained 0.3% over SGD. That means translation gains were not significant. Although CNY gained 3.7% over SGD and Temasek had substantial Chinese assets, these are in American Depository Receipts, which are basically USD assets. - Did asset growth come from debts? Temasek had been taking on debt since 2014, rising from S$9b to S$90b as at 31 Mar 2022. In 2022 debt increased by S$8.5b. - Did it come from capital injection? There was no fresh capital injection, in fact equity decreased by S$4.6b in 2022. So where did the increase in S$22b in asset value come from? It came from a mix of operating gains (???), translation gains (???), and debt (S$8.5b) -- shared more or less equally. Where did GIC's S$280b asset growth come from?: - Did it come from profits? Who the heck knows. Checking out GIC performance is like looking into a black hole. We can only speculate. I'm betting my right arm GIC profits for 2022 wasn't anything to crow about for the simple reason that if it were so, the state media would have celebrated the current year ROI instead of hiding behind a 20 year annualised rate and about returns beating inflation rate. - Did it come from currency translation? We are looking at a black hole. But this much I can say. In terms of currencies, GIC has 2 sources of funds. One is from forex reserves from MAS. It is likely that these funds would be invested in the relevant countries so there is no asset-liability mismatch, no translation losses. Two is about S$1 trillion of SGD debt + land sales + budget surpluses which are subject to translation risks if invested overseas without a hedging strategy. - Did it come from valuation? Again, no way to tell. But note that GIC had 37% portfolio in bonds and cash. The bonds should be bleeding heavy losses in the current rising interest rate scenario and was a significant dampener on profits. - Did it come from injection of fresh funds? Aha, this, I have plenty to talk about. GIC gained a fabulous S$280b in portfolio value in 2022. PAP uno numero fan Singapore resident Polish blogger Critical Spectator could not help but to write with glee. His Facebook echo chamber of fawning supporters and opposition haters asked with unabashed sarcasm where are the critics now? Sadly lacking is the independent brain power to stop and ask where did the increase come from. Well, a substantial part of the increase came from fresh funds injected : - S$108b from net increase in securities issued (issuance less redemptions) - S$75b new RMGS issued (for MAS forex reserves transferred to GIC) - S$13b from sales of land. So S$196b fresh funds were provided to GIC to invest., of which S$183b was from government debt. And what did I say about capital injection? Any idiot can increase asset portfolio - it's not an insult but an aphorism. The more important question to ask is where did the increase of the balance of S$84b (S$280b-S$196b) of GIC's asset increase come from? I have no idea and nobody's talking. Don't we all know a narrative can be spin in several ways. GIC and Temasek squirmed in word salad instead of telling it as it is. GIC lectured about high falutin 'Rolling 20 Year Annualised Rate Of Return' that cannot be measured against anything. They will not plain speak about current year ROI. Temasek talked about their participation in Singapore Airlines' mandatory convertible bonds issue "enabling the airline to strengthen its balance sheet and to position it for the resumption of global travel" and Sembcorp Marine's rights issues "which strengthened its balance sheet and liquidity position, accelerating its strategic pivot to high-growth renewable and clean energy segments" when the whole world knows Santa Claus was bailing out two troubled companies. https://chem-post.blogspot.com/2022/07/Three-big-lies-about-the-national-reserves-that-you-should-know-about.html
THREE BIG LIES ABOUT THE NATIONAL RESERVES THAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT content media
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Ashley Wu
Jul 21, 2022
In Chillin' In The Lounge
He was the perfect boyfriend before marriage. Very caring, sensitive. Would rush to pay for our meals. We talked a lot. He seemed to understand me very well. He opined that a man ought to be both he head of a household as well as disciplinarian. I wanted to break up with him on a few occasions, however he would wait below my flat at 6am to plead with me not to. He would appear very broken-hearted when I initiated breaking off. I didn’t know that such actions were what they call “love bombing” aka “gaslighting”, or put it simply psychological manipulation. I had a few other suitors back then, so I guess he probably wanted to “triumph" over them. Right after marriage, he became a totally different person. Zero talk. Zero communication. Kept telling me he had no money. Did zero housework. When I had enough of his stealing (of my hard-earned money) and lies and wanted to divorce, he cried and begged for forgiveness. It took me many years of resignation before I finally decided that if I didn’t want to die as his wife, I’d better divorce while I still could. Just because I met a scammer/narcissist does not mean all men are like him. Most of my friends and sisters are happily married with sound-minded husbands. I can only say I made the wrong choice and didn’t cut my losses by leaving early. I have lived my whole life for my kids. Now that they are older, I actually feel that I get to live for myself for once. I also get to keep whatever I earn, without having to worry a man would come and surreptitiously nick dollars from my bag or drawer. Frankly, I think kids are overrated. lol. Kids are nice but they are very expensive. And they may not turn out the way you want them to, unless you are Sherry Tan who could spend 23 years as a taitai nurturing them. It’s hard to answer the question “if you could choose again, would you marry and have kids?” I think when people say “I wouldn’t marry if I have a choice again”, they actually meant “I wouldn’t marry the same person and have his kids”. I have witnessed enough happy marriages to believe that a happy marriage is possible - but the man must be a decent person, like duh right? LOL Sorry for the wall of text, however too many folks judge me for my failed marriage. They think I married a scammer knowing he’s already lazy, irresponsible and kept asking me for money. A scammer is what he is. A scammer. And it’s no fault of mine if I was tricked.
I have finally gotten divorced, and it seriously feels good  content media
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Ashley Wu
Jul 21, 2022
Dear ICA, come I clap for you. content media
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Ashley Wu
Jun 27, 2022
Houston, I mean Amy Cock, now we have another problem. content media
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Ashley Wu
Apr 29, 2022
Dear Postman, I have lost my mailbox key! content media
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Ashley Wu
Feb 05, 2022
ONE Championship maids edition @ Lucky Plaza - fight ah fight! content media
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Ashley Wu
Jan 14, 2022
In Current Affairs
From Albirex Niigata to Balestier Khalsa, very few would not recognise Christina Rodrigues Seah. She was often seen either in the stands or in more recent years, with a camera along the sidelines when matches were played. She made it a point to suss out opportunities surrounding friendly matches, and would even volunteer her time for these if and when they actually happen . Because she was a true fan. Unfortunately, Seah’s life was prematurely cut short when she passed away on 12 January, shocking friends and members of the football fraternity alike. Her boyfriend – Jeremy Neubronner posted about how she had been battling heart problems and making numerous visits to the hospital ever since she received her second vaccination. A photo which appeared to be a doctor’s diagnosis was also posted, which is now being circulated online. In July, Seah had put up a lengthy post on her Facebook page which gave indications about her well-being. Even when she was down, she did what she could to share her innermost thoughts about the local game. REACTIONS FROM FANS If there was ever an award for Singapore’s most loyal football fans, Seah would definitely qualify. Reactions from the community were heartfelt. The Singapore football family mourns for Christina Rodrigues Seah. https://themonitor.sg/2022/01/13/singapore-football-loses-one-of-its-most-passionate-followers/
39-year-old female suffered heart failure, died after receiving 2nd dose of vaccine content media
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Ashley Wu
Jan 09, 2022
Discarded supermarket trolleys....here, there, everywhere! content media
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Ashley Wu
Sep 05, 2021
In Chillin' In The Lounge
SINGAPORE: As Betty* lay curled into a ball on the floor — in tears, hyperventilating, heart beating rapidly — the secondary school teacher hoped the panic attack would fade soon. Because she knew she could not afford to spend time away from work. “I have to get over it, I have to go and mark (papers) and do my work,” she thought. Her panic attacks typically happen once a fortnight. A heavy workload, dealing with parents’ expectations and large class sizes are perennial stressors, for her and some other teachers. It was worse for Betty when Singapore moved to full home-based learning in April last year amid concerns over escalating COVID-19 infections. The frequency of her panic attacks increased to twice a week. “We suddenly had to pivot to online learning … in a very short couple of days, push out and create resources from scratch, record ourselves doing online lectures, design online quizzes,” she said. “That was extremely stressful. We still needed to give feedback to our students and continue giving them work and continue preparing more resources. It was like the work never stops. I was really, really burnt out — very, very depleted.” Apart from the workload, some teachers feel that their mental health has been overlooked or not prioritised. After the River Valley High School (RVHS) incident took place, Susan*, who is from another school, was on the alert for students on “suicide watch”. But also running through her mind was whether she could finally raise the issue of teachers’ mental health. So when she was giving her principal a routine update on her at-risk students, she decided to “boldly ask” about that. “I was rather saddened to hear her say, ‘the mental health of teachers? It depends on all of you. You guys are adults. You need to take care of each other and watch out for one another,’” she recounted. While it sounded “noble”, it felt “quite invalidating”, Susan said. “It’s a failure to recognise that you need to take care of the caregiver.” Betty and Susan are among the 100-plus teachers who responded to CNA Insider’s call on Instagram for teachers to share how they were coping mentally. One teacher wrote: “It’s terrible being a teacher in the past two years. I know my mental health is at an all-time low.” Another said: “These two years have been especially rough because … the workload has increased drastically, and it’s taking a physical and emotional toll on us. We’re in a pandemic and no concession for teachers has been made.” A primary school teacher who’s been teaching for four years shared: “When we expressed our stress and mental exhaustion, we were simply told, ‘Teachers should learn how to manage their own stress.’ I contemplated quitting every week for my well-being.” In an interview with CNA Insider, Mrs Chua-Lim Yen Ching, the deputy director-general of education (professional development) from the Ministry of Education (MOE) said the ministry “can’t deny that COVID-19 has affected us”. She disclosed that in an MOE engagement survey conducted in June among 460 teachers, seven in 10 respondents said “they can cope” with work stress. “But having said that, we still need to help the three out of 10. (It) doesn’t mean that because seven out of 10 said that they were good, then we say okay,” she said. Questions about teachers’ well-being were added to the survey for the first time last year. “We realised that the staff’s well-being was very important, and we wanted to have representative data,” she noted. “All of us will have stress, (but) the most important (thing) is that we must be able to cope. It’s only when you’re stressed and you can’t cope, we get worried.” So why do some teachers struggle to keep their heads above water and, like some of their students, fall through the cracks? TEACHERS’ PANDEMIC WOES Asked about the stressors affecting them lately, most teachers CNA Insider spoke to pointed to the rapid switch to home-based learning during last year’s circuit breaker. They cited the need to create online lesson materials quickly, pick up skills to deliver engaging lessons and make sure that students attend classes. That period “played with (her) mind”, said Susan, a secondary school teacher of 15 years. She was frustrated when “half the time” she had to ask students to switch on their camera and “every morning” she had to call students who did not sign in. “I was very frustrated such that I had to go and run every day,” she added. While full home-based learning was already a challenge for younger, more tech-savvy teachers, Melissa* said some older colleagues were “left out”. “Older teachers were like, ‘How to log in here, how to log in there?’ There was a lot of stress put on them,” said the secondary school teacher. Indeed, *Lisa, who is in her 50s and has been teaching at a primary school for 20 years, felt “shitty” when home-based learning came into force, as the “learning curve” to pick up new technologies was “very steep”. “Compared to my time (when I started teaching), I wanted to learn so much from teachers who’ d been teaching (for a long time). But now, newer teachers look at me like I have nothing much to (contribute),” she said. Today, these teaching and administrative worries have only taken a new shape as physical lessons resume on a “blended learning model” where home-based learning occurs once a fortnight. Whenever there is a spike in COVID-19 cases, David* must also “stand by”with online lesson packages in the event that schools revert to full home-based learning. The secondary school mathematics teacher recalled a time when “almost every single day”, he had to prepare extra material; “most” of it did not end up being used. On top of the extra teaching workload, teachers now have a host of “nightmarish” COVID-related administrative duties, like keeping track of students’ and fellow teachers’ quarantine orders and COVID-19 test results, said secondary school geography teacher Sally*. “The Ministry of Health was constantly coming up with new directives on how long to keep them at home, whether the school will go on home-based learning, when approved absence starts (and) ends, the swab tests. “It was a lot to deal with,” she added. All this additional work has put teachers in a state of “heightened alert”, said Singapore Teachers’ Union (STU) general secretary Mike Thiruman. “They (still) have to do everything that they’d been doing before COVID-19 … There’s a lot of nervous energy, and they have to be on guard all the time. “There’s a limit to how long you can be in this heightened alert state. (At some point) it just wears you out.” A lot more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/cna-insider/my-mental-health-all-time-low-teachers-talk-burnout-moe-aware-gaps-need-plugging-2157151
‘My mental health is at an all-time low’: Teachers talk of burnout, MOE aware that ‘gaps’ need plugging  content media
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Ashley Wu
Aug 26, 2021
In Chillin' In The Lounge
Tan isn't afraid to demonstrate he is a powerful figure with friends in high places. The personal impression given is that he is capable of covering up misdeeds committed and influence the government to do his bidding. Provided herein is a consolidation of all his alleged transgressions; let's pray that justice will prevail in due time.
President of Taoist Federation Mr Tan Thiam Lye exposed content media
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Ashley Wu
Aug 05, 2021
In Chillin' In The Lounge
Worst DMs Girls In Singapore Received Many aren’t new to the world of direct messaging or DMs, where one can easily connect and interact with old friends and even strangers online. While I’m sure you’ve heard of stories of people meeting their soulmates or date prospects through an Instagram DM, the world of instant messaging isn’t all sunshine and rainbows. You might be shocked at just how many girls receive weird DMs on their social media accounts daily, with messages ranging from being inappropriate or derogatory in nature to long paragraphs of extremely uncomfortable sexually-fuelled messages. If you’ve been a victim of these DMs yourself, know that you’re not alone and help is available out there. We spoke to 8 girls who shared some of the worst DMs they have received, along with some resources you can go to if you find yourself in a similar situation. P.S. Trigger warning: this article contains screenshots that include inappropriate messages. *Names have been changed for confidentiality purposes. 1. The Christian Grey Wannabe “The weirdest DM I received was accompanied by an explicit picture from someone I didn’t know at all — I don’t appreciate being sexualised by strangers especially in that way. I can’t help what random people want to do with my photos or my face but I would prefer it if people just wouldn’t do that. Emotionally, I think it was quite scary but this wasn’t the first time that I had gotten an explicit picture. It’s just quite disturbing, lah. I felt really scared for a while, because I knew there was not much I could do. Before this, I also faced a situation where harmless pictures of me eating Pepper Lunch in public were posted on Tumblr and getting sexualised when the picture literally wasn’t anything of that nature. After my friends and I eventually reported these things to the police, we got responses like “IP address can’t be tracked” or that because it wasn’t physical harassment or a case where my photos were being used for monetary profits, it wasn’t against any law. I ended up just talking to my boyfriend and friends about what happened and left it alone. The best thing that I think you can do sometimes is just not engage in confrontation. I choose not to let these things get to me at the end of the day because I really can’t stop what people do online and I think there isn’t much legal action that’ll help.” — Sam, 23 2. The Aristotle But Budget Edition “I rarely receive DMs, but there is this one guy from my college who has been stalking me on Facebook and Instagram for the past 10 years. The first time this creep approached me online, he said he was doing interviews for his college paper. He tried to have a “philosophical” conversation with me where he sent nonsensical stuff that he presumed would be thought-provoking, when they were actually just incoherent and extremely creepy. He would address me as “my lady” and use words like “ergo”. He often started the conversation with, “we must speak, much importantly”. After I answered some of his “philosophical” questions, he started gushing about how “beautiful” my mind was in a really awkward and weird way — like trying to use formal, old English, but with extremely bad grammar. He would then create fake accounts on Facebook, add all my friends, and try to get in touch with me via DMs or by DM-ing them to ask me to reply to him. This has been happening on and off for the past 10 years, so to say he’s creepy is a huge understatement. A few years ago one of my university friends posted about him on her Facebook and that’s when I realised he was harassing other girls as well! I’ve told a friend about it, but not my husband because it felt shameful. I didn’t go and seek any help because how do you find someone operating off a faceless, fake account? He just deletes it and starts all over again. The only other thing I did was to threaten him with a police report. From experience, I would advise that depending on how you feel, it may be helpful to post about your own encounters to see if anyone else you know is going through the same thing. Otherwise, just block them; and keep blocking them. Instagram now lets you block a person and all other accounts they may create so I really do hope that’s helpful. If it gets bad, take screenshots and go lodge a police report.” — Maya, 32 3. The Poop Enthusiast “I tend to ignore DMs quite often, especially when they are non-conversational or broach topics I don’t want to discuss… like my poop. Nothing weird really ever creeps me out, but the creepiest was probably this one. It’s pretty self-explanatory why it was weird; the person made it pretty obvious that they had a poop fetish. The DM didn’t really make me feel much, but I definitely felt amused and I think I restricted the account after. My only advice following the incident is that you should know how to filter what you consume online and don’t let other people’s thoughts or words influence your self-perceptions.” — Han Ping, 25 4.The Period Care-Package “The weirdest DM I’ve received read, “Don’t care if you’re on your period, just come over for cuddles” – from a guy I was talking to no less. It’s just weird out of context but I think we were joking around before it happened. It just caught me by surprise because it sounded so crude. The guy who sent me the DM and I weren’t exactly strangers, but we were not best friends either. I found it funny at first, but I realised overtime, if a guy could say something so blunt to me and I let him, what does that say about me? I didn’t exactly tell my close friends about it, because I could see how it might come across as a small comment that I could easily get over. It didn’t affect my day-to-day life, but now and again I would look back at that time in my life and tell myself it’s all in the past. My advice to others: I’ve been there and it’s not pretty, but I hope you know you’re much more than what any guy would ever say to you!” — Sonia, 22 5. The Monsters Inc Disappointment “The nature of DMs I receive are usually MLM companies asking me to join them and creepy people complimenting or asking for weird stuff like foot pictures. Rarely is it ever just actual girls being nice and sharing compliments. I leave probably almost all the DMs I get from new people unread. I guess the strangest DM I’ve received was a message asking me to send my dirty, used socks. I thought to myself “Dude, I don’t know you and even if I do I’m not going to give you my dirty socks?”. I didn’t respond to him but he was definitely a stranger since his account was private and we didn’t have any mutual followers — granted he had none but was following loads of accounts. Because this wasn’t really an invasion of my privacy, I didn’t feel like how some might feel towards a stalker or someone threatening to do something to them. While I believe they would be afraid or even angry, I was just amused and disgusted. I showed my family and boyfriend the messages and we made some jokes that I could probably be making good money from it but nothing else. It became a sort of reflection with my family about how there are so many weird people out there and it just sucks that as women, it’s something we can’t escape. I would advise others who experience similar behaviour online to just always take screenshots when there’s something fishy or weird going on because nowadays people can easily delete the message and you don’t want a “he said, she said” situation. On a more serious note, if someone is blackmailing or invading your privacy, bring it up to the authorities or tell someone you trust and get them to go with you when you make the report. Why should we be embarrassed when they are the embarrassing ones?” — Clara, 23 6. The D-Pic Dude “For guys who are strangers that DM me, some will comment about how pretty or cute they think I am and from there ask if I wanna be friends then almost immediately after we’ve just started talking, want to hang out together. I don’t usually entertain such DMs unless I actually know of that person’s existence, like as an acquaintance from school or work. If I don’t know who that person is at all, I’ll just ignore it. I feel that if girls actually reply to these types of DMs, it gets interpreted that we are giving them “hope” and that we want to reciprocate whatever it is they are thinking about — even if we have replied just to be polite. Seriously though, stranger danger! The weirdest DM I can recall was when a guy sent me an explicit picture. It was just weird and I deleted, blocked and reported the account straight away after seeing it because I was terrified! What made it worse is that it was someone I totally didn’t know. A conversation never even occurred prior so this was definitely the weirdest one I’ve ever received. Whenever I receive weird DMs like this, I usually talk to my friends about it but I will personally block and report it first. I don’t think I’ve reached a stage where I need to seek help but I have had thoughts about changing my Instagram account from public to private. However, I feel that at the end of the day, there’s really no point since it’s my own account after all and I shouldn’t let their actions affect me. My opinion is that it’s perfectly fine to make friends online but always try to gate-keep and protect yourself against any harm. Put a stop to anything whenever you feel things are going sour and don’t ever feel bad for ghosting the people that deserve to be ghosted – trust your feelings.” — Van, 21 7. The “He Really Should Be In Jail” Dude “The DMs I receive are usually friendly, either asking about wanting to be friends or asking questions about my school or internship . I entertain them when they’re asking genuine questions and not sending random requests like “can we be friends?” I don’t think my social media feed is interesting enough for someone to want to be friends with me: they probably either want money or nudes. The craziest DM I‘ve received was when an “anonymous guy” had taken nude photos of my male schoolmate while he was bathing and sent it to me. Apparently this was because he could tell from my Instagram that I was from the same school. It was illegal and I was left with the moral dilemma of whether to let my schoolmate know of the existence of those photos or not. The sender was really weird – one moment he would be really rude and the next he would start conversing normally. Eventually, he turned out to be my schoolmate’s friend or acquaintance. After I decided to let my schoolmate know, the sender got pretty aggressive. I felt really scared and was afraid that I’d get faulted for entertaining him in the first place. I went to find a way to contact my schoolmate to let him know what was going on and that we should report the pervert to the police. He was really repulsed by the entire situation initially and just wanted to conclude the incident by deleting the photos from my Instagram DMs. I explained that it wasn’t sufficient and the best way was to remove the photos from the source: the pervert’s phone. My schoolmate took some time to digest what was happening and he let me know that those pictures were taken during a stayover and that he actually knew who had done it. Eventually, my schoolmate met up with the pervert to make sure the photos got deleted along with the pictures of other people that he’d found on his phone. I talked to a few trusted friends and asked for opinions on what to do during the period when this occurred. I blocked the weirdo after the whole incident, but my schoolmate still strongly refused to report it to the police. Since I felt that it was his privacy that had been violated, I respected his wishes. The incident made me lose a little bit more faith in humanity. I occasionally still think of the other girls whose photos were taken by him, and also struggle dealing with the guilt of not reporting it to the police. After the incident, I made sure to think twice before replying to DMs and about what could potentially happen. I would say that you should always seek help from a trusted adult or the police if you feel threatened and don’t be afraid to do what is right!” — Erica, 21 8. The Ctrl+C + Ctrl+V “The DMs I receive are either very random, as if a bot had sent them or they’re just plain creepy. Usually they ask me to accept their follow request, send pictures of myself, or are “sugar daddies” asking for my details. Most of the time I open them, but I don’t really entertain them. I feel like it’s a personal waste of time to talk to them. But, if I’m bored, I’ll occasionally reply to “troll” them for my own entertainment or curiosity. This guy who had been DM-ing me assumed we were very close and asked me when we could go out numerous times. This made me uncomfortable. I tried to ghost him or cut him off, but he didn’t seem to get the hint until I asked my guy friend to DM him about how I felt. The person definitely had low social and self-awareness, and the accumulation of messages made it increasingly creepy because of just how much his desperation seeped through the messages. I think the scariest thing about this type of situation is that these kinds of people are really common and me, as a young 15-year-old girl back then, probably assumed he was being friendly when in reality, he was a creep or pervert.These situations can happen to anyone and I reckon if I was more naïve and keen, it would’ve been much more dangerous than what I had gone through. At the time, I didn’t feel like anyone close to me, especially figures of authority, would have understood my situation. I was also scared of being scolded for even having online friends in the first place. I ended up blocking him as I got older and started to notice how weird the situation was. I consider myself quite lucky that nothing obscene or sexually demeaning had occurred to me. Honestly, one should make sure to put yourself first and always keep yourself safe. I fully understand the desire for human connection, especially in a day and age where real-life social interactions have been greatly reduced. However, some people may not have the purest of intentions. I feel that conversations need to begin young about potential intentions that people may have, how to know if you’re being gaslit or groomed and such.” — Alice, 21 https://zula.sg/worst-dms-singapore/
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Ashley Wu
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https://www.change.org/p/prime-minister-of-singapore-lee-hsien-loong-do-not-let-vaccination-status-divide-us
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